Obstetric Emergency – My Midwifery Placement

Throughout our lives there are specific events that change the way we see ourselves and others. Whether these events are good, or bad, we learn from them.

This blog is dedicated to the maternity staff at Raigmore Hospital.

During my first placement as a second year midwife I experienced my first obstetrical emergency. We had been taught the basics of emergency management in uni before this placement, but I wasn’t expecting having to put it into practice so soon. It’s quite good that I can now look back on it and apply the theory from uni to what happened.

The emergency buzzer was pulled, and so followed just about every member of staff on the ward to that room within a few seconds, including myself and another lovely student midwife from my year. One of my mentors asked if I’d like to scribe for purposes of documentation, and while I was pretty anxious I took the pen and paper. The midwives were fantastic in guiding me on what to write, for instance what was happening at what time and who was present.

While I documented, the other student was helping with whatever she could, and she would check that I was alright as it was all happening, and I really appreciated that support. After a while when things started to settle down and the woman was stable, I realised just how many people had come to assist. Senior charge midwives, staff midwives, auxiliaries, healthcare assistants, consultants and registrars; here were a group of healthcare professionals, people with incredible skills and knowledge, communicating and working together to the best of their abilities for the benefit of this vulnerable woman. I am in awe of each and every one of them.

My mentor briefed me on what had happened once it was all over, and she was incredibly supportive considering it was the first time for me. I’m glad that I was able to experience an emergency with the guidance of these midwives as they were so caring and committed. These amazing midwives who sometimes work overtime, tired and hungry on long shifts, dehydrated, maybe even facing problems out-with work but leave it all at the door to do one of the most rewarding jobs.

The midwives, doctors, nurses, staff of the NHS deserve so much recognition for the work they do. It was quite surreal finishing the shift and walking back to my accommodation, passing people in the street and just thinking they have no idea what I had seen that day. That experience was mine to take home, to reflect on and learn from.

I’m so grateful to my mentor for making that entire placement block enjoyable and educational. I learned so much from her, and I’ll count myself lucky if I’m half the midwife she is one day. I’m also grateful to the student midwife who pretty much looked after both of us (if you’re reading this you know who you are, and you were amazing that day).

This emergency experience is something that I will remember throughout my career and in years to come.

 

Emma

 

If you are interested in studying a degree in Midwifery take a look at the RGU website.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s